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SC-04 Applied Concepts in Fractured Reservoirs

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

Saturday, 25 September Sunday, 26 September 2021, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.  |  

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Who Should Attend

Geologists, Engineers, and Students

Geologists who need to characterize and understand fracture systems and their effects on reservoir permeability from core and outcrops, who need to be able to differentiate between natural and induced fractures in cores, and who would like to be able to predict the effects of lithology on fracturing.

Engineers who want to understand fracture permeability in relationship to the in situ stress system, the interaction of natural fractures with hydraulic stimulation fractures, and the important differences between extension and shear fractures in controlling individual fracture permeability and the interconnectivity of fracture networks.

Objectives

  • Different fracture types have different effects on reservoir permeability.
  • Not all fractures are effective in enhancing reservoir permeability.
  • Fracture types can vary by lithology within the same structural setting.
  • Fracture types can vary by structural setting within the same lithology.
  • Fracture permeability can be sensitive to changes in the in situ stress during production.
  • Recognizing fracture type in the small sampling of a reservoir offered by core can provide a conceptual model differentiating radial from anisotropic drainage.
  • The interaction of natural fractures with hydraulic stimulation fractures depends on fracture type and orientation relative to the in situ stresses.
  • The student will obtain insights into fracture mechanics and the origins of fractures, and use those concepts in a very applied sense to instill an understanding of natural fractures and their potential effects on reservoirs.
  • Students will come away from the course with an appreciation of the wide range of structures that fall under the basket term “fracture”.

Course Content

This is a hands-on class anchored with a 65-piece teaching collection of natural and induced fractures in core that students will work with during class exercises. The class provides insights into fracture mechanics and the origins of fractures, and uses those concepts in a very applied sense to instill an understanding of natural fractures and their potential effects on permeability and fluid flow. This has direct applications to the petroleum, geothermal, CO2 sequestration and environmental industries.

Discussions, lectures and exercises include differentiating fractures by type and the effects of different fracture types on reservoir permeability, and the fracture types expected in different structural domains and reservoirs. Course modules also include how to differentiate natural from induced fractures in cores and the use of image logs and their calibration with core. We will also discuss the interactions between natural fractures, in situ stresses, and stimulation fractures.

Students will come away from the class with an appreciation of the wide range of structures that fall under the basket term “fracture”, and an understanding that different fracture types do not have the same effect on hydrocarbon reservoirs.

Fees

Fees:
Professionals: $700
Students: $350
Limit:
25 People

Venue

SC-04 Applied Concepts in Fractured Reservoirs

Instructors

Scott Patrick Cooper Scott Cooper 2021-2021 FractureStudies LLC, USA
John Clay Lorenz John Lorenz 2021-2021 FractureStudies LLC, USA

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Contacts

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